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Amritsar Golden Temple Tour.
8,16 € *
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Golden Temple Walking Tour by Globe Trek Travel starts at the Partition Museum, located inside Amritsar City Hall. There, our English language speaking guide will tell you all about the background behind the disturbances which led to British India breaking into two different countries, India and Pakistan. This is the perfect location to learn more about both Amritsar and the country in general.As we explore the narrow, bustling streets of the Old Town, you will see a replica of the Indian Parliament and a statue of Babasaheb Ambedkar, a famous social reformer .Continuing our journey through the history of Amritsar and Sikhism, the Akal Takht, the highest seat of religious authority for SikhismThe next point on our tour is Amritsar's symbolic icon, the Golden Temple. This impressive place of worship is captivating not only for its beautiful architecture but also the ambiance of respect and spirituality that is felt in its vicinity.

Anbieter: Viator – Ein Trip...
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Gandhi and Architecture (eBook, PDF)
27,66 € *
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Gandhi and Architecture: A Time for Low-Cost Housing chronicles the emergence of a low-cost, low-rise housing architecture that conforms to M.K. Gandhi's religious need to establish finite boundaries for everyday actions; finitude in turn defines Gandhi's conservative and exclusionary conception of religion. Drawing from rich archival and field materials, the book begins with an exploration of Gandhi's religiosity of relinquishment and the British Spiritualist, Madeline Slade's creation of his low-cost hut, Adi Niwas, in the village of Segaon in the 1930s. Adi Niwas inaugurates a low-cost housing architecture of finitude founded on the near-simultaneous but heterogeneous, conservative Gandhian ideals of pursuing self-sacrifice and rendering the pursuit of self-sacrifice legible as the practice of an exclusionary varnashramadharma. At a considerable remove from Gandhi's religious conservatism, successive generations in post-colonial India have reimagined a secular necessity for this Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude. In the early 1950s era of mass housing for post-partition refugees from Pakistan, the making of a low-cost housing architecture was premised on the necessity of responding to economic concerns and to an emerging demographic mandate. In the 1970s, during the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, it was premised on the rise of urban and climatological necessities. More recently, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its reception has been premised on the emergence of language-based identitarianism in Wardha, Maharashtra. Each of these moments of necessity reveals the enduring present of a Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude and also the need to emancipate Gandhian finitude from Gandhi's own exclusions. This volume is a critical intervention in the philosophy of architectural history. Drawing eclectically from science and technology studies, political science, housing studies, urban studies, religious studies, and anthropology, this richly illustrated volume will be of great interest to students and researchers of architecture and design, housing, history, sociology, economics, Gandhian studies, urban studies and development studies.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Gandhi and Architecture (eBook, ePUB)
27,66 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Gandhi and Architecture: A Time for Low-Cost Housing chronicles the emergence of a low-cost, low-rise housing architecture that conforms to M.K. Gandhi's religious need to establish finite boundaries for everyday actions; finitude in turn defines Gandhi's conservative and exclusionary conception of religion. Drawing from rich archival and field materials, the book begins with an exploration of Gandhi's religiosity of relinquishment and the British Spiritualist, Madeline Slade's creation of his low-cost hut, Adi Niwas, in the village of Segaon in the 1930s. Adi Niwas inaugurates a low-cost housing architecture of finitude founded on the near-simultaneous but heterogeneous, conservative Gandhian ideals of pursuing self-sacrifice and rendering the pursuit of self-sacrifice legible as the practice of an exclusionary varnashramadharma. At a considerable remove from Gandhi's religious conservatism, successive generations in post-colonial India have reimagined a secular necessity for this Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude. In the early 1950s era of mass housing for post-partition refugees from Pakistan, the making of a low-cost housing architecture was premised on the necessity of responding to economic concerns and to an emerging demographic mandate. In the 1970s, during the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, it was premised on the rise of urban and climatological necessities. More recently, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its reception has been premised on the emergence of language-based identitarianism in Wardha, Maharashtra. Each of these moments of necessity reveals the enduring present of a Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude and also the need to emancipate Gandhian finitude from Gandhi's own exclusions. This volume is a critical intervention in the philosophy of architectural history. Drawing eclectically from science and technology studies, political science, housing studies, urban studies, religious studies, and anthropology, this richly illustrated volume will be of great interest to students and researchers of architecture and design, housing, history, sociology, economics, Gandhian studies, urban studies and development studies.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Gandhi and Architecture (eBook, PDF)
27,66 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Gandhi and Architecture: A Time for Low-Cost Housing chronicles the emergence of a low-cost, low-rise housing architecture that conforms to M.K. Gandhi's religious need to establish finite boundaries for everyday actions; finitude in turn defines Gandhi's conservative and exclusionary conception of religion. Drawing from rich archival and field materials, the book begins with an exploration of Gandhi's religiosity of relinquishment and the British Spiritualist, Madeline Slade's creation of his low-cost hut, Adi Niwas, in the village of Segaon in the 1930s. Adi Niwas inaugurates a low-cost housing architecture of finitude founded on the near-simultaneous but heterogeneous, conservative Gandhian ideals of pursuing self-sacrifice and rendering the pursuit of self-sacrifice legible as the practice of an exclusionary varnashramadharma. At a considerable remove from Gandhi's religious conservatism, successive generations in post-colonial India have reimagined a secular necessity for this Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude. In the early 1950s era of mass housing for post-partition refugees from Pakistan, the making of a low-cost housing architecture was premised on the necessity of responding to economic concerns and to an emerging demographic mandate. In the 1970s, during the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, it was premised on the rise of urban and climatological necessities. More recently, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its reception has been premised on the emergence of language-based identitarianism in Wardha, Maharashtra. Each of these moments of necessity reveals the enduring present of a Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude and also the need to emancipate Gandhian finitude from Gandhi's own exclusions. This volume is a critical intervention in the philosophy of architectural history. Drawing eclectically from science and technology studies, political science, housing studies, urban studies, religious studies, and anthropology, this richly illustrated volume will be of great interest to students and researchers of architecture and design, housing, history, sociology, economics, Gandhian studies, urban studies and development studies.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Gandhi and Architecture (eBook, ePUB)
27,66 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Gandhi and Architecture: A Time for Low-Cost Housing chronicles the emergence of a low-cost, low-rise housing architecture that conforms to M.K. Gandhi's religious need to establish finite boundaries for everyday actions; finitude in turn defines Gandhi's conservative and exclusionary conception of religion. Drawing from rich archival and field materials, the book begins with an exploration of Gandhi's religiosity of relinquishment and the British Spiritualist, Madeline Slade's creation of his low-cost hut, Adi Niwas, in the village of Segaon in the 1930s. Adi Niwas inaugurates a low-cost housing architecture of finitude founded on the near-simultaneous but heterogeneous, conservative Gandhian ideals of pursuing self-sacrifice and rendering the pursuit of self-sacrifice legible as the practice of an exclusionary varnashramadharma. At a considerable remove from Gandhi's religious conservatism, successive generations in post-colonial India have reimagined a secular necessity for this Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude. In the early 1950s era of mass housing for post-partition refugees from Pakistan, the making of a low-cost housing architecture was premised on the necessity of responding to economic concerns and to an emerging demographic mandate. In the 1970s, during the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, it was premised on the rise of urban and climatological necessities. More recently, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its reception has been premised on the emergence of language-based identitarianism in Wardha, Maharashtra. Each of these moments of necessity reveals the enduring present of a Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude and also the need to emancipate Gandhian finitude from Gandhi's own exclusions. This volume is a critical intervention in the philosophy of architectural history. Drawing eclectically from science and technology studies, political science, housing studies, urban studies, religious studies, and anthropology, this richly illustrated volume will be of great interest to students and researchers of architecture and design, housing, history, sociology, economics, Gandhian studies, urban studies and development studies.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Das Ende des rechten Winkels
73,05 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Im Mittelpunkt dieses Buches steht das Werk des Architekten Wilhelm Ulrich (1890-1971), der die Vorherrschaft des rechten Winkels seit den zwanziger Jahren in Frage stellte und fünf Jahrzehnte an der hexagonalen Alternative arbeitete. Seine markanten Bauten in Halle an der Saale waren nach der politischen Wende in schlechtem Zustand und werden von der Forschung bis dato weitgehend mißachtet. Ulrichs persönliches Scheitern ist somit auch ein exemplarisches deutsches Schicksal als Folge von zwei Kriegen und der Teilung des Landes. Trotz seiner eigenwilligen Position war Ulrich in hohem Maße in die Architektur- und Geistesgeschichte seiner Zeit eingebunden und rückte wie die Theoretiker des "Neuen Bauens" die Funktionalität ins Zentrum seiner Argumentation. Diese begriff er jedoch nicht als vorübergehende Modeform, sondern als eine lebenslange und stets aufs Neue zu überprüfende Aufgabe. Mit Ulrich erweitert sich somit der Blickwinkel auf die Architektur des 20. Jahrhunderts, der sich zumeist auf die Ikonen des Bauhauses beschränkt - dem als Inbegriff der Moderne propagierten rechten Winkel erkennt Ulrich die Ausschließlichkeit ab. Im Rahmen dieser Studie werden erstmals Wohn- und Siedlungsbauten, Kirchen, Kaufhäuser, die hexagonale Stadtplanung sowie Entwürfe vorgestellt, durch ein Werkverzeichnis ergänzt und mit umfangreichem Abbildungsmaterial aus Archiven und Privatbesitz illustriert. Zahlreiche Beispiele hexagonaler Bauformen in den siebziger Jahren, also nach Ulrichs aktiver Zeit, vervollständigen die Ausführungen und verweisen auf die Weitsicht seiner Argumentation. Dieses Buch leistet somit einen gewichtigen Beitrag zur Wiederentdeckung eines Architekten, dessen Bauweise die Formenvielfalt moderner Architektur eindrucksvoll dokumentiert. The focus of this book is the work of the architect Wilhelm Ulrich (1890-1971) who in the 1920s began to question the dominance of the right angle, and worked for five decades on hexagonal alternatives. His striking buildings in Halle an der Saale were in a bad condition after the political change, and have been largely disregarded by experts until now. Ulrich's personal failure also exemplifies a typical German fate as a result of two wars and the partition of the country. Despite his idiosyncratic position, Ulrich was very closely involved in the architectural and intellectual history of his time and, like the theorists of the "New Building" placed functionality at the centre of his arguments. However, he considered this not merely as a passing fashion but as a lifelong task requiring constant reappraisal. With Ulrich, we get a wider perspective on 20th century architecture, usually restricted to the icons of the Bauhaus - Ulrich denies the exclusivity of the right angle, trumpeted as the epitome of modernism. This study presents for the first time Ulrich's houses and housing developments, churches, shops, hexagonal town plans and designs, supplemented with a catalogue of his works and a wealth of illustrations from archives and private collections. Numerous examples of hexagonal buildings from the 1970s, after Ulrich's time, complete the work and demonstrate the far-sightedness of his arguments. This book is an important step in the rediscovery of an architect whose building style is in itself an impressive document of the formal variety of modern architecture.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Das Ende des rechten Winkels
73,05 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Im Mittelpunkt dieses Buches steht das Werk des Architekten Wilhelm Ulrich (1890-1971), der die Vorherrschaft des rechten Winkels seit den zwanziger Jahren in Frage stellte und fünf Jahrzehnte an der hexagonalen Alternative arbeitete. Seine markanten Bauten in Halle an der Saale waren nach der politischen Wende in schlechtem Zustand und werden von der Forschung bis dato weitgehend mißachtet. Ulrichs persönliches Scheitern ist somit auch ein exemplarisches deutsches Schicksal als Folge von zwei Kriegen und der Teilung des Landes. Trotz seiner eigenwilligen Position war Ulrich in hohem Maße in die Architektur- und Geistesgeschichte seiner Zeit eingebunden und rückte wie die Theoretiker des "Neuen Bauens" die Funktionalität ins Zentrum seiner Argumentation. Diese begriff er jedoch nicht als vorübergehende Modeform, sondern als eine lebenslange und stets aufs Neue zu überprüfende Aufgabe. Mit Ulrich erweitert sich somit der Blickwinkel auf die Architektur des 20. Jahrhunderts, der sich zumeist auf die Ikonen des Bauhauses beschränkt - dem als Inbegriff der Moderne propagierten rechten Winkel erkennt Ulrich die Ausschließlichkeit ab. Im Rahmen dieser Studie werden erstmals Wohn- und Siedlungsbauten, Kirchen, Kaufhäuser, die hexagonale Stadtplanung sowie Entwürfe vorgestellt, durch ein Werkverzeichnis ergänzt und mit umfangreichem Abbildungsmaterial aus Archiven und Privatbesitz illustriert. Zahlreiche Beispiele hexagonaler Bauformen in den siebziger Jahren, also nach Ulrichs aktiver Zeit, vervollständigen die Ausführungen und verweisen auf die Weitsicht seiner Argumentation. Dieses Buch leistet somit einen gewichtigen Beitrag zur Wiederentdeckung eines Architekten, dessen Bauweise die Formenvielfalt moderner Architektur eindrucksvoll dokumentiert. The focus of this book is the work of the architect Wilhelm Ulrich (1890-1971) who in the 1920s began to question the dominance of the right angle, and worked for five decades on hexagonal alternatives. His striking buildings in Halle an der Saale were in a bad condition after the political change, and have been largely disregarded by experts until now. Ulrich's personal failure also exemplifies a typical German fate as a result of two wars and the partition of the country. Despite his idiosyncratic position, Ulrich was very closely involved in the architectural and intellectual history of his time and, like the theorists of the "New Building" placed functionality at the centre of his arguments. However, he considered this not merely as a passing fashion but as a lifelong task requiring constant reappraisal. With Ulrich, we get a wider perspective on 20th century architecture, usually restricted to the icons of the Bauhaus - Ulrich denies the exclusivity of the right angle, trumpeted as the epitome of modernism. This study presents for the first time Ulrich's houses and housing developments, churches, shops, hexagonal town plans and designs, supplemented with a catalogue of his works and a wealth of illustrations from archives and private collections. Numerous examples of hexagonal buildings from the 1970s, after Ulrich's time, complete the work and demonstrate the far-sightedness of his arguments. This book is an important step in the rediscovery of an architect whose building style is in itself an impressive document of the formal variety of modern architecture.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Letterkenny
39,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Letterkenny, Battle of Scarrifholis, Architecture of Letterkenny, Public art in Letterkenny, List of Letterkenny people, History of rail transport in Ireland, River Swilly, Tyrconnell, Plantation of Ulster, Partition of Ireland, Conn of the Hundred Battles. County Donegal, Niall of the Nine Hostages, St. Conal's Psychiatric Hospital, Letterkenny Institute of Technology, Belfast International Airport, NI Railways.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Intel Paragon
39,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! The Intel Paragon was a series of massively parallel supercomputers produced by Intel. The Paragon XP/S was a productized version of the experimental Touchstone Delta system built at Caltech, launched in 1992. The Paragon superseded Intel's earlier iPSC/860 system, to which it was closely related.The Paragon series was based around the Intel i860 RISC microprocessor. Up to 2048 (later, up to 4000) i860s were connected in a 2D grid. In 1993, an entry-level Paragon XP/E variant was announced with up to 32 compute nodes. The system architecture was a partitioned system, with the majority of the system comprising diskless compute nodes and a small number of I/O nodes interactive service nodes. Since the bulk of the nodes had no permanent storage, it was possible to "Red/Black switch" the compute partition from classified to unclassified by disconnecting one set of I/O nodes with classified disks and then connecting an unclassified I/O partition.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 04.08.2020
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