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Partition and the Practice of Memory
100,39 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 20.12.2017, Medium: Buch, Einband: Gebunden, Titel: Partition and the Practice of Memory, Auflage: 1. Auflage von 2017 // 1st ed. 2018, Redaktion: Mahn, Churnjeet // Murphy, Anne, Verlag: Springer International Publishing, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: Asien // Geschichte // Bangladesh // Geschichtsschreibung // Historiographie // Indien // Vorderindien // Kulturgeschichte // Pakistan // Sozialgeschichte // Asiatische Geschichte // Sozial // und Kulturgeschichte, Rubrik: Geschichte // Regionalgeschichte, Seiten: 296, Informationen: HC runder Rücken kaschiert, Gewicht: 497 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
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Partition and the Practice of Memory
102,39 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 24.05.2018, Medium: Taschenbuch, Einband: Kartoniert / Broschiert, Titel: Partition and the Practice of Memory, Auflage: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2018, Redaktion: Mahn, Churnjeet // Murphy, Anne, Verlag: Springer International Publishing, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: Asiatische Geschichte // Sozial // und Kulturgeschichte, Rubrik: Geschichte // Regionalgeschichte, Seiten: 296, Informationen: Paperback, Gewicht: 386 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

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Partition and the Practice of Memory
106,99 € *
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Partition and the Practice of Memory ab 106.99 € als Taschenbuch: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2018. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, English, International, Gebundene Ausgaben,

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Partition and the Practice of Memory
96,49 € *
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Partition and the Practice of Memory ab 96.49 € als pdf eBook: . Aus dem Bereich: eBooks, Geschichte & Dokus,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Sovereignty Suspended (eBook, ePUB)
50,66 € *
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What is de facto about the de facto state? In Sovereignty Suspended, this question guides Rebecca Bryant and Mete Hatay through a journey into de facto state-building, or the process of constructing an entity that looks like a state and acts like a state but that much of the world says does not or should not exist. In international law, the de facto state is one that exists in reality but remains unrecognized by other states. Nevertheless, such entities provide health care and social security, issue identity cards and passports, and interact with international aid donors. De facto states hold elections, conduct censuses, control borders, and enact fiscal policies. Indeed, most maintain representative offices in sovereign states and are able to unofficially communicate with officials. Bryant and Hatay develop the concept of the "aporetic state" to describe such entities, which project stateness and so seem real, even as nonrecognition renders them unrealizable.Sovereignty Suspended is based on more than two decades of ethnographic and archival research in one so-called aporetic state, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC). It traces the process by which the island's "north" began to emerge as a tangible, separate, if unrecognized space following violent partition in 1974. Like other de facto states, the TRNC looks and acts like a state, appearing real to observers despite international condemnations, denials of its existence, and the belief of large numbers of its citizens that it will never be a "real" state. Bryant and Hatay excavate the contradictions and paradoxes of life in an aporetic state, arguing that it is only by rethinking the concept of the de facto state as a realm of practice that we will be able to understand the longevity of such states and what it means to live in them.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Sovereignty Suspended (eBook, ePUB)
50,66 € *
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What is de facto about the de facto state? In Sovereignty Suspended, this question guides Rebecca Bryant and Mete Hatay through a journey into de facto state-building, or the process of constructing an entity that looks like a state and acts like a state but that much of the world says does not or should not exist. In international law, the de facto state is one that exists in reality but remains unrecognized by other states. Nevertheless, such entities provide health care and social security, issue identity cards and passports, and interact with international aid donors. De facto states hold elections, conduct censuses, control borders, and enact fiscal policies. Indeed, most maintain representative offices in sovereign states and are able to unofficially communicate with officials. Bryant and Hatay develop the concept of the "aporetic state" to describe such entities, which project stateness and so seem real, even as nonrecognition renders them unrealizable.Sovereignty Suspended is based on more than two decades of ethnographic and archival research in one so-called aporetic state, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC). It traces the process by which the island's "north" began to emerge as a tangible, separate, if unrecognized space following violent partition in 1974. Like other de facto states, the TRNC looks and acts like a state, appearing real to observers despite international condemnations, denials of its existence, and the belief of large numbers of its citizens that it will never be a "real" state. Bryant and Hatay excavate the contradictions and paradoxes of life in an aporetic state, arguing that it is only by rethinking the concept of the de facto state as a realm of practice that we will be able to understand the longevity of such states and what it means to live in them.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Gandhi and Architecture (eBook, PDF)
28,04 € *
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Gandhi and Architecture: A Time for Low-Cost Housing chronicles the emergence of a low-cost, low-rise housing architecture that conforms to M.K. Gandhi's religious need to establish finite boundaries for everyday actions; finitude in turn defines Gandhi's conservative and exclusionary conception of religion. Drawing from rich archival and field materials, the book begins with an exploration of Gandhi's religiosity of relinquishment and the British Spiritualist, Madeline Slade's creation of his low-cost hut, Adi Niwas, in the village of Segaon in the 1930s. Adi Niwas inaugurates a low-cost housing architecture of finitude founded on the near-simultaneous but heterogeneous, conservative Gandhian ideals of pursuing self-sacrifice and rendering the pursuit of self-sacrifice legible as the practice of an exclusionary varnashramadharma. At a considerable remove from Gandhi's religious conservatism, successive generations in post-colonial India have reimagined a secular necessity for this Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude. In the early 1950s era of mass housing for post-partition refugees from Pakistan, the making of a low-cost housing architecture was premised on the necessity of responding to economic concerns and to an emerging demographic mandate. In the 1970s, during the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, it was premised on the rise of urban and climatological necessities. More recently, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its reception has been premised on the emergence of language-based identitarianism in Wardha, Maharashtra. Each of these moments of necessity reveals the enduring present of a Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude and also the need to emancipate Gandhian finitude from Gandhi's own exclusions. This volume is a critical intervention in the philosophy of architectural history. Drawing eclectically from science and technology studies, political science, housing studies, urban studies, religious studies, and anthropology, this richly illustrated volume will be of great interest to students and researchers of architecture and design, housing, history, sociology, economics, Gandhian studies, urban studies and development studies.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 12.07.2020
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Gandhi and Architecture (eBook, ePUB)
28,04 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Gandhi and Architecture: A Time for Low-Cost Housing chronicles the emergence of a low-cost, low-rise housing architecture that conforms to M.K. Gandhi's religious need to establish finite boundaries for everyday actions; finitude in turn defines Gandhi's conservative and exclusionary conception of religion. Drawing from rich archival and field materials, the book begins with an exploration of Gandhi's religiosity of relinquishment and the British Spiritualist, Madeline Slade's creation of his low-cost hut, Adi Niwas, in the village of Segaon in the 1930s. Adi Niwas inaugurates a low-cost housing architecture of finitude founded on the near-simultaneous but heterogeneous, conservative Gandhian ideals of pursuing self-sacrifice and rendering the pursuit of self-sacrifice legible as the practice of an exclusionary varnashramadharma. At a considerable remove from Gandhi's religious conservatism, successive generations in post-colonial India have reimagined a secular necessity for this Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude. In the early 1950s era of mass housing for post-partition refugees from Pakistan, the making of a low-cost housing architecture was premised on the necessity of responding to economic concerns and to an emerging demographic mandate. In the 1970s, during the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, it was premised on the rise of urban and climatological necessities. More recently, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its reception has been premised on the emergence of language-based identitarianism in Wardha, Maharashtra. Each of these moments of necessity reveals the enduring present of a Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude and also the need to emancipate Gandhian finitude from Gandhi's own exclusions. This volume is a critical intervention in the philosophy of architectural history. Drawing eclectically from science and technology studies, political science, housing studies, urban studies, religious studies, and anthropology, this richly illustrated volume will be of great interest to students and researchers of architecture and design, housing, history, sociology, economics, Gandhian studies, urban studies and development studies.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 12.07.2020
Zum Angebot
Gandhi and Architecture (eBook, PDF)
28,04 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Gandhi and Architecture: A Time for Low-Cost Housing chronicles the emergence of a low-cost, low-rise housing architecture that conforms to M.K. Gandhi's religious need to establish finite boundaries for everyday actions; finitude in turn defines Gandhi's conservative and exclusionary conception of religion. Drawing from rich archival and field materials, the book begins with an exploration of Gandhi's religiosity of relinquishment and the British Spiritualist, Madeline Slade's creation of his low-cost hut, Adi Niwas, in the village of Segaon in the 1930s. Adi Niwas inaugurates a low-cost housing architecture of finitude founded on the near-simultaneous but heterogeneous, conservative Gandhian ideals of pursuing self-sacrifice and rendering the pursuit of self-sacrifice legible as the practice of an exclusionary varnashramadharma. At a considerable remove from Gandhi's religious conservatism, successive generations in post-colonial India have reimagined a secular necessity for this Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude. In the early 1950s era of mass housing for post-partition refugees from Pakistan, the making of a low-cost housing architecture was premised on the necessity of responding to economic concerns and to an emerging demographic mandate. In the 1970s, during the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, it was premised on the rise of urban and climatological necessities. More recently, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its reception has been premised on the emergence of language-based identitarianism in Wardha, Maharashtra. Each of these moments of necessity reveals the enduring present of a Gandhian low-cost housing architecture of finitude and also the need to emancipate Gandhian finitude from Gandhi's own exclusions. This volume is a critical intervention in the philosophy of architectural history. Drawing eclectically from science and technology studies, political science, housing studies, urban studies, religious studies, and anthropology, this richly illustrated volume will be of great interest to students and researchers of architecture and design, housing, history, sociology, economics, Gandhian studies, urban studies and development studies.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 12.07.2020
Zum Angebot